Monday: Reflection on the Twenty-second Sunday in Ordinary Time

Monday: Reflection on the Twenty-second Sunday in Ordinary Time

Revised Common Lectionary Proper 17
Roman Catholic Proper 22

Complementary Hebrew Scripture: 2 Samuel 11:2-26

It happened, late one afternoon, when David rose from his couch and was walking about on the roof of the king's house, that he saw from the roof a woman bathing; the woman was very beautiful. David sent someone to inquire about the woman. It was reported, “This is Bathsheba daughter of Eliam, the wife of Uriah the Hittite.” So David sent messengers to get her, and she came to him, and he lay with her. (Now she was purifying herself after her period.) Then she returned to her house. The woman conceived; and she sent and told David, “I am pregnant.”

So David sent word to Joab, “Send me Uriah the Hittite.” And Joab sent Uriah to David. When Uriah came to him, David asked how Joab and the people fared, and how the war was going. Then David said to Uriah, “Go down to your house, and wash your feet.” Uriah went out of the king's house, and there followed him a present from the king. But Uriah slept at the entrance of the king's house with all the servants of his lord, and did not go down to his house. When they told David, “Uriah did not go down to his house,” David said to Uriah, “You have just come from a journey. Why did you not go down to your house?” Uriah said to David, “The ark and Israel and Judah remain in booths; and my lord Joab and the servants of my lord are camping in the open field; shall I then go to my house, to eat and to drink, and to lie with my wife? As you live, and as your soul lives, I will not do such a thing.” Then David said to Uriah, “Remain here today also, and tomorrow I will send you back.” So Uriah remained in Jerusalem that day. On the next day, David invited him to eat and drink in his presence and made him drunk; and in the evening he went out to lie on his couch with the servants of his lord, but he did not go down to his house.

In the morning David wrote a letter to Joab, and sent it by the hand of Uriah. In the letter he wrote, “Set Uriah in the forefront of the hardest fighting, and then draw back from him, so that he may be struck down and die.” As Joab was besieging the city, he assigned Uriah to the place where he knew there were valiant warriors. The men of the city came out and fought with Joab; and some of the servants of David among the people fell. Uriah the Hittite was killed as well. Then Joab sent and told David all the news about the fighting; and he instructed the messenger, “When you have finished telling the king all the news about the fighting, then, if the king's anger rises, and if he says to you, ‘Why did you go so near the city to fight? Did you not know that they would shoot from the wall? Who killed Abimelech son of Jerubbaal? Did not a woman throw an upper millstone on him from the wall, so that he died at Thebez? Why did you go so near the wall?’ then you shall say, ‘Your servant Uriah the Hittite is dead too.””

So the messenger went, and came and told David all that Joab had sent him to tell. The messenger said to David, “The men gained an advantage over us, and came out against us in the field; but we drove them back to the entrance of the gate. Then the archers shot at your servants from the wall; some of the king's servants are dead; and your servant Uriah the Hittite is dead also.” David said to the messenger, “Thus you shall say to Joab, ‘Do not let this matter trouble you, for the sword devours now one and now another; press your attack on the city, and overthrow it.’ And encourage him.”

When the wife of Uriah heard that her husband was dead, she made lamentation for him.

Semi-continuous Hebrew Scripture: Exodus 4:10-31

But Moses said to the Lord, “O my Lord, I have never been eloquent, neither in the past nor even now that you have spoken to your servant; but I am slow of speech and slow of tongue.” Then the Lord said to him, “Who gives speech to mortals? Who makes them mute or deaf, seeing or blind? Is it not I, the Lord? Now go, and I will be with your mouth and teach you what you are to speak.” But he said, “O my Lord, please send someone else.” Then the anger of the Lord was kindled against Moses and he said, “What of your brother Aaron, the Levite? I know that he can speak fluently; even now he is coming out to meet you, and when he sees you his heart will be glad. You shall speak to him and put the words in his mouth; and I will be with your mouth and with his mouth, and will teach you what you shall do. He indeed shall speak for you to the people; he shall serve as a mouth for you, and you shall serve as God for him. Take in your hand this staff, with which you shall perform the signs.”

Moses went back to his father-in-law Jethro and said to him, “Please let me go back to my kindred in Egypt and see whether they are still living.” And Jethro said to Moses, “Go in peace.” The Lord said to Moses in Midian, “Go back to Egypt; for all those who were seeking your life are dead.” So Moses took his wife and his sons, put them on a donkey and went back to the land of Egypt; and Moses carried the staff of God in his hand.

And the Lord said to Moses, “When you go back to Egypt, see that you perform before Pharaoh all the wonders that I have put in your power; but I will harden his heart, so that he will not let the people go. Then you shall say to Pharaoh, 'Thus says the Lord: Israel is my firstborn son. I said to you, “Let my son go that he may worship me.” But you refused to let him go; now I will kill your firstborn son.’”

On the way, at a place where they spent the night, the Lord met him and tried to kill him. But Zipporah took a flint and cut off her son's foreskin, and touched Moses' feet with it, and said, “Truly you are a bridegroom of blood to me!” So he let him alone. It was then she said, “A bridegroom of blood by circumcision.”

The Lord said to Aaron, “Go into the wilderness to meet Moses.” So he went; and he met him at the mountain of God and kissed him. Moses told Aaron all the words of the Lord with which he had sent him, and all the signs with which he had charged him. Then Moses and Aaron went and assembled all the elders of the Israelites. Aaron spoke all the words that the Lord had spoken to Moses, and performed the signs in the sight of the people. The people believed; and when they heard that the Lord had given heed to the Israelites and that he had seen their misery, they bowed down and worshiped.

Complementary Psalm 17

Hear a just cause, O Lord;
 attend to my cry;
 give ear to my prayer from lips free of deceit.
From you let my vindication come;
 let your eyes see the right.

If you try my heart, if you visit me by night, if you test me,
 you will find no wickedness in me;
 my mouth does not transgress.

As for what others do, by the word of your lips
 I have avoided the ways of the violent.
My steps have held fast to your paths;
 my feet have not slipped.

I call upon you, for you will answer me, O God;
 incline your ear to me, hear my words.
Wondrously show your steadfast love,
 O savior of those who seek refuge
 from their adversaries at your right hand.

Guard me as the apple of the eye;
 hide me in the shadow of your wings,
 from the wicked who despoil me,
 my deadly enemies who surround me.

They close their hearts to pity;
 with their mouths they speak arrogantly.

They track me down; now they surround me;
 they set their eyes to cast me to the ground.
They are like a lion eager to tear,
 like a young lion lurking in ambush.

Rise up, O Lord, confront them, overthrow them!
By your sword deliver my life from the wicked,
 from mortals—by your hand, O Lord—
 from mortals whose portion in life is in this world.

May their bellies be filled with what you have stored up for them;
 may their children have more than enough;
 may they leave something over to their little ones.

As for me, I shall behold your face in righteousness;
 when I awake I shall be satisfied,
 beholding your likeness.

Semi-continuous Psalm 83:1-4, 13-18

O God, do not keep silence;
 do not hold your peace or be still, O God!
Even now your enemies are in tumult;
 those who hate you have raised their heads.
They lay crafty plans against your people;
 they consult together against those you protect.
They say, “Come, let us wipe them out as a nation;
 let the name of Israel be remembered no more.”

O my God, make them like whirling dust,
 like chaff before the wind.
As fire consumes the forest,
 as the flame sets the mountains ablaze,
 so pursue them with your tempest
 and terrify them with your hurricane.

Fill their faces with shame,
 so that they may seek your name, O Lord.
Let them be put to shame and dismayed forever;
 let them perish in disgrace.
Let them know that you alone, whose name is the Lord,
 are the Most High over all the earth.

New Testament Lesson: Revelation 3:1-6

“And to the angel of the church in Sardis write: These are the words of him who has the seven spirits of God and the seven stars:

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“I know your works; you have a name of being alive, but you are dead. Wake up, and strengthen what remains and is on the point of death, for I have not found your works perfect in the sight of my God. Remember then what you received and heard; obey it, and repent. If you do not wake up, I will come like a thief, and you will not know at what hour I will come to you. Yet you have still a few persons in Sardis who have not soiled their clothes; they will walk with me, dressed in white, for they are worthy. If you conquer, you will be clothed like them in white robes, and I will not blot your name out of the book of life; I will confess your name before my Father and before his angels. Let anyone who has an ear listen to what the Spirit is saying to the churches.”

 

Year A Ordinary 22, RCL Proper 17, Catholic Proper 22 Monday

 

Bible verses from The New Revised Standard Version, copyright 1989 by the Division of Christian Education of the National Council of Churches of Christ in the United States of America. Used by permission. All right reserved.

Selections from Revised Common Lectionary Daily Readings, copyright 1985 by Consultation on Common Texts.

Image Credit: Funeral image by Pixabay user bernswaelz, via Pixabay. This is a public domain image.

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